$130.00

Brand: vendor-unknown

Color Of Canvas:

  • Full Color
  • Sepia
  • Black and White

Size Of Canvas:

  • 18X24
  • 27X36
  • 36X54
  • 3-10x20
  • 3-12x24
  • 3-16x32
  • 3-20x40
  • 3-24x48
  • 3-30x60

Type Of Canvas:

  • Rolled Canvas ( no frame )
  • Triptych Canvas

Share on:

Product Description

Mesa Zion National Park Canvas Prints

Mesa Zion National Park Canvas Prints Japanese garden styles include karesansui, Japanese rock gardens or Zen gardens, which are meditation gardens where white sand replaces water; roji, simple, rustic gardens with teahouses where the Japanese tea ceremony is conducted;, promenade or stroll gardens, where the visitor follows a path around the garden to see carefully composed landscapes; and tsubo niwa, small courtyard gardens. Japanese gardens were developed under the influences of the Chinese gardens ,but gradually Japanese garden designers began to develop their own aesthetics, based on Japanese materials and Japanese culture. By the Edo period, the Japanese garden had its own distinct appearance. Since the end of the 19th century, Japanese gardens have also been adapted to Western settings. apanese gardens first appeared on the island of Honshu, the large central island of Japan. Their aesthetic was influenced by the distinct characteristics of the Honshu landscape; rugged volcanic peaks, narrow valleys, mountain streams with waterfalls and cascades, lakes, and beaches of small stones. They were also influenced by the rich variety of flowers and different species of trees, particularly evergreen trees, on the islands, and by the four distinct seasons in Japan, including hot, wet summers and snowy winters. Japanese gardens have their roots in the Japanese religion of Shinto, with its story of the creation of eight perfect islands, and of the shinchi, the lakes of the gods. Prehistoric Shinto shrines to the kami, the gods and spirits, are found on beaches and in forests all over the island. Prehistoric shrines often took the form of unusual rocks or trees marked with cords of rice fiber and surrounded with white stones or pebbles, a symbol of purity.[5] The white gravel courtyard became a distinctive feature of Shinto shrines, Imperial Palaces, Buddhist temples, and zen gardens.

Related Products